PROCESS EXAMPLES

Use the examples on this page in conjunction with the Lesson Plan to help students visualize the steps in a user-centered design process.
The examples are taken from two KCAD projects where students, faculty, potential users, design professionals and K-12 educators collaborated to create product concepts.

The Infinity Mode concept imagines college experience without all the baggage.

The Journey to Mars concept imagines a virtual-reality field trip that can happen right inside a k-12 classroom.

PROCESS

DEFINE

Defining problems is a collaborative process. The diverse thinking style of each individual will come together to create powerful, hybrid ideas. Though every idea is considered, many of them will fail to make it into the final problem definition.

Staging photographs illustrating a problem you want to solve is a great exploration process. In this case, an art student has to carry far too much "stuff".

Simple sketches can aid communication between team members.

Staging photographs illustrating a problem you want to solve is a great exploration process. In this case, an art student has to carry far too much "stuff".

Simple sketches can aid communication between team members.

EXPLORE

Exploring solutions to problems begins with sketches, including storyboarding. Most ideas will fail to make it into the final design. However, they are integral to the process of developing the ones that do.

Notes on sketches can help to explain an idea, even of the designer is not there to present the concept.

Some sketches can be taken to a "presentation" level of refinement to help sell the idea.

This is a "low-fidelity" prototype. Simple mock-ups like this can help to visualize spatial relationships, including scale.

Acting out user experience ideas and capturing them in photos can trigger high level thinking.

REFINE

Product development is finalized through a repeated cycle of rendering, prototyping, user testing, noting failures and redesigning.

Highly rendered digital-3d models can help designers visualize and advance form and function before building physical prototypes.

Many products have digital interfaces that need to be developed in tandem with the physical attributes.

Hand built physical prototypes are the best way to obtain feedback on the form, finish and functionality of a product design.

Rigorous user testing cycles that drive design improvements are necessary to correct issues prior to mass-production.

BUILD

Mass production of any product requires a coordinated effort between all facets of the supply chain and consumers. This business flow chart, for the Amplified Virtual Field Trip, outlines the integration of production, marketing, sales and consumption. The product design served the "wants" of every stakeholder simultaneously and this was accomplished by receiving feedback from each one through every phase of the development process.